Closing the “color” Gap in Public Schools: An open discussion

How can we increase the population of minority public school educators and administrators in this country? Our schools are populated with students of color, but few educators of color to teach and lead them…. For more details on this alarming problem, see the following article http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/03/student-teacher-demographics_n_5738888.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000595 Please feel free to provide comments.

 

The Mike Brown “Special”

Are you disturbed yet? Are you really understanding what has been going on in our society for decades? Do you truly understand the social injustices that continue to occur? That we are NOT a “post-racial” society? That systems of power, privilege, and oppression are still in full force? Wake Up, Realize, Learn, Challenge the system, become a Change Agent!

Mike Brown Special

Texas governor Rick Perry Indicted

Well I cannot say I didn’t see this coming, he’s been running amok in Texas politics for as long as I can remember and eventually every dog has its day…
Perry calls it a “Political Farce” but is it farcical?
To make a long story short, Perry the Republican Texas Governor has been replacing every Democrat in office with a Republican, and when a particular Democrat stood up to him by not resigning, he cut the budget to her entire department, which is illegal. Perhaps it’s just a coincidence that this particular office investigated the ethics of elected officials.

Police

Police are like dogs. Their behavior is dependent on their masters. Who are the masters of the police? Their job is to protect and serve the wealthy and politically active and to enforce the will of those in power. Until they start murdering the rich or until minorities start to start to take a more political approach on the whole, this will only be an issue in which we are talking loud, but no one is actually listening. Discussion is great, but it needs to leads to action.

Return to segregation?

In this (once again great) Frontline report, they examine the return to segregation in american schools:

Here in texas we have been watching the gradual change in the quality of education. Over the last 20 years, and even more recently it seems, even to a casual eye, that it is harder and harder to get a good education from a public school when you are in a large city. Inner city schools have not always been bad, but what is the reason that they are so poor these days, to the point where the middle class no longer believe in them, and those that are in them, feel stuck with them? What is it that make people believe that public schools aren’t even worth the effort in trying to save them?

An Open Discussion on Money & Racism in the US

Rascism

 

 

 

 

money

Racism and Money are both topics that spur much dialogue, debate, research, controversy, and a plethora of emotions.

Although some people believe that we are now a “post racist” society, there are many who still believe that because of historical institutional contexts, racism still very well exists in today’s society.

Moving along to the subject of money,

even typing the phrase “money in America” into Google brings forth a wide array of topics, resources, and information from images of the US dollar, to articles on the use of money as a form of social control, to money and politics, and even wealth inequality in America.

So let’s once again combine the two concepts “Money and Racism.” When I first think of these two concepts together, my mind instantly tries to make a correlation between the two and prompts instant questions like: Is money one of the institutional ideologies that contribute to racism? Is money one of the major reasons for the proliferation of racism in America? How did money and racism contribute to the success and decline of slavery in America? Does racism play into the economic disparities among racial/ethnic groups in the US? Is money a system of social control that involves racism in some way?

Again, there are certainly opposing views and opinions about all of these questions. In my opinion, our capitalist society yields both positive and negative influences on our economic and social positions as a nation, and racism definitely plays into this. We cannot deny that there is economic disparity within this country that is directly tied to racism. We also cannot deny that there are systems of oppression in place that contribute to the disparity of wealth but also contribute to the inability for certain people to progress economically. This means that our ideal of capitalism that we hold so near and dear in society is tainted and distorted.

One thing I believe that we can and should do is discuss this issue in a civil manner. While I continue to explore the correlation between these two concepts, feel free to take a look at other viewpoints/sources of info. on the web and comment that I have provided below.

I believe this to be a fascinating topic of discussion that is long overdue on BBS. Will you contribute to the discussion? Your contributions are strongly encouraged!

  1. American Money: The Economic Origins or Racism from BET News :   http://www.bet.com/news/national/2013/02/05/american-money-the-economic-origins-of-racism.html
  2. Racism is About Money and Power: The Race Card Project : http://theracecardproject.com/racism-money-power/
  3. Racism Influences How People Deal with money: Jezebel: http://jezebel.com/5795514/racism-influences-how-people-deal-with-money

Race and the New Economy

This is an excellent read from Yes! magazine contributor Penn Loh: What’s the Role of Race in the New Economy Movement?

On a deeper level, race matters because the economy we currently have is deeply racialized. Race and racism are central to how the dominant economy functions, whom it serves, and who pays the costs of obscene wealth accumulation and environmental unsustainability. Race and class in the United States are inextricably intertwined, beginning with slavery and Native American genocide and continuing to this day with the struggle of immigrants. In short, how we live in and experience the economy differs drastically depending on our race and class.

I think that this is something that should surely be addressed because people of color have long been aware that they are ignored at the top and only are consequential when it serves the purpose of people who are already benefitting from the policies in place. Which is why many have no issue with resigning themselves from attempting to do better or insist on working outside of the common wisdom when it comes to finance.

The Crushing Weight of Student Debt

from this Time article

Households headed by a young college graduate with student loans outstanding have a typical net worth of just $8,700—a pittance compared to the typical $64,700 net worth of similar households only with no student loans outstanding. But that’s just the start. Those with student loans have total debts of $137,010—nearly double the typical $73,250 indebtedness of those without student debt outstanding.

The title is only rich kids should go to college, I might have to agree as I can see for myself and others will be paying back student loans for at least 10 years, while trying to build a life with the education we’ve acquired.

Should the price of education be as much as your monthly rent? How much are we prepared to sacrifice in order to get the parchment that gets us to higher levels of income (hopefully)?

Seattle’s Mayor Proposes $15 per hour for Minimum Wage

Yesterday, Seattle’s mayor Ed Murray announced a plan to raise the minimum wage to $15 per hour. If implemented, the minimum wage would continue to increase over the next 3-7 years until it reaches $15 per hour for workers. This plan comes as part of a nationwide push from the Obama Administration to combat inequality.

At a recent press conference Murray stated that Seattle can potentially “lead the conversation and the nation to address this growing problem of income inequality”.

Seattle is the first major US city to make this kind of commitment but the hope is that others will follow. The plan must still be approved by Seattle’s City Council.  If the plan is approved, it will give small businesses with fewer than 500 workers seven years to implement the plan. Large businesses would have three years.