7 Interesting Facts About HBCUs

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I have been reading some interesting information and articles about HBCUs. From debating their relevance in modern higher education, to financial issues and leadership issues at various campuses, HBCUs have been met with much criticism and scrutiny as of late. I plan to continue to read, research and report my findings along with a little of my own opinions from my higher education experience and experience as an HBCU student and alum.

To kick off the coverage on HBCUs below are 7 interesting facts that many people do not know about HBCUs:

7 Interesting Facts about HBCUs

  1. There are 105 historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the US.
  2. HBCUs have graduated a Nobel Prize Winner, astronauts, educators, generations of public leaders, politicians, professional athletes, celebrities and many more individuals who have made unique and impactful contributions to society.
  3. Cheyney University in Pennsylvania is the oldest HBCU.
  4. Howard University, known as the “HBCU Flagship” is the only HBCU to have a line item in the federal budget. Howard was founded in 1867.
  5. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter signed the Executive Order establishing the White House Initiative on HBCUs. The basis of this initiative is to for the advocacy and lobbying for HBCU financial relationships with federal agencies through contracts and grants. In 2012 these financial relationships fell $115 from the previous year.
  6. HBCUs graduate a higher percentage of students majoring in computer sciences than other colleges.
  7. Howard University and Meharry Medical College were the only HBCUs that offered medical education until 1975, when the Morehouse School of Medicine was established.

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Content for this post was adapted from the August 2013 issue of Essence Magazine 

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