Trump puts Bannon on security council, dropping joint chiefs

The strategist will join high-level security meetings while the military’s role is downgraded.

via BBC http://j.mp/2kHOJak

The Judicial Branch Grabs Back

In 2005, Donald J. Trump told Access Hollywood’s Billy Bush, “I’m automatically attracted to beautiful [women]—I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star they let you do it. You can do anything. … Grab them by the pussy. You can do anything."

via Slate Articles http://j.mp/2k6sbNk

The very long list of Republicans in Congress who have taken no position on Trump’s refugee ban

A very small number have expressed any kind of support for it.

Note: We are updating this story as more legislators put out statements.

Trump’s executive order, which bans entry into the US if you’re from one of seven Muslim-majority countries, was signed on Friday afternoon. Almost every Democratic member of Congress publicly opposed the order, either on Twitter, Facebook, or a statement.

But the list of every Republican legislator who did the same is very short as of Sunday morning:

Even fewer Republican legislators expressed any kind of support for the executive action, though one was a voice that carries particular weight: House Speaker Paul Ryan, whose spokeswoman AshLee Strong insisted Saturday that it was “not a religious test and it is not a ban on people of any religion.”

Few others backed it, though:

That leaves the large majority of legislators in this final column: those who said nothing or issued a statement that took no real position. (Note: We’ll update this list as we go.) Some legislators posted on social media about it, but took no stance, like Rep. Dave Trott and Rep. Dave Brat.

We visited every single legislator’s website and social media feeds, and it was eerie to see legislator after legislator posting on Facebook about Holocaust Remembrance Day — about how we can’t forget the atrocities, and how we can’t let it happen again.

via Vox – All http://j.mp/2k6oYNQ

bannon is the reason

the face of hate behind the face of hate.

http://www.vox.com/2017/1/27/14370854/trump-refugee-ban-order-muslim

When the ban came out, the fallout was everywhere, but this article

The exchange (which begins around the 17 minute mark here) starts Trump riffing about how top foreign-born Ivy league graduates should be allowed to stay in America where they can be “job creators.” But then Bannon spoke up to disagree, and he did so in a very revealing way:

TRUMP: We have to keep our talented people in this country.

BANNON: Um—

TRUMP: I think you agree with that. Do you agree with that?

BANNON: Well I got a tougher — you know, when two thirds or three quarters of the CEOs in Silicon Valley are from South Asia or from Asia, I think — on, my point is, a country’s more like, [inaudible], a country’s more than an economy. We’re a civic society.

Bannon’s “statistic” that over two-thirds of Silicon Valley CEOs are Asian-born isn’t even close to being true, since only a small minority are. But the bigger takeaway is that Bannon was clearly disturbed enough by this mistaken idea to bring it up. He was clearly trying to choose his words carefully, but he made it crystal clear that he was disturbed by the (fictional) idea of all these Asian-born CEOs running around in America.

Once you keep those views in mind, the method behind the “madness” of the Trump administration’s treatment of green card holders becomes clear. Most Republicans generally profess to love legal immigration. They say they are only concerned with the illegal variety (and Trump himself has said the same).

But some of the people around Trump, like Bannon, top White House policy aide Stephen Miller, and attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions, go much further. They want to privilege native-born Americans over even the most entrepreneurial and industrious (and legal) immigrants.

Missouri school fight felony

If we allow children to be charged with felonies for fighting at school, we are opening up the floodgates for hundreds of thousands more incarcerated individuals. Disproportionate numbers will continue to include: girls/women and boys/men of color.

New Missouri Law Makes Grade School Fights A Felony

San Antonio elects first African American Mayor

Ivy Taylor

 

On June 13, 2015 Ivy R. Taylor was elected Mayor of San Antonio; before this, she was appointed by the San Antonio City Council to serve as interim Mayor following Julian Castro’s departure.

Ivy Taylor is the first African American person and first woman to be elected mayor of San Antonio. Taylor is also the second female African American mayor elected in Texas history, and the first Black person to be elected in a city that is majority Hispanic.

Previously, she served as a City Council Representative for five years. Mayor Taylor also worked in San Antonio in the City’s Housing and Community Development and Neighborhood Action Departments. Additionally, she worked with a variety of community associations and organizations on city redevelopment projects. Mayor Taylor previously worked as the Vice President for Merced Housing Texas, and is currently a lecturer in the Public Administration Department and College of Public Policy at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA).

Mayor Taylor earned a bachelor’s degree in American Studies from Yale University and a Master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from UNC Chapel Hill.

 

While attending UNC, she served as an intern with the San Antonio Affordable Housing Association and coalition of affordable housing groups, peaking her interests in housing, urban development and public policy. Taylor has served on the City Planning Commission of San Antonio, on the Board of Directors for the Urban Renewal Agency of San Antonio, Haven for Hope, and currently, is a board member for the Martinez Street Women’s Center.

 

A History of Violence Part One

In lieu of recent protesting and more specifically, the “riots” in Baltimore, let us take some time to think back on the birth of our nation and the struggles that people had to endure for the American Revolution. We do indeed have a history of violence in this country. There were protests, riots, and looting. Remember this? Sons of Liberty

bostonteaparty2009_sm

America’s College Promise Proposal

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 9, 2015

FACT SHEET: White House Unveils America’s College Promise Proposal:

Tuition-Free Community College for Responsible Students

Nearly a century ago, a movement that made high school widely available helped lead to rapid growth in the education and skills training of Americans, driving decades of economic growth and prosperity. America thrived in the 20th century in large part because we had the most educated workforce in the world.  But other nations have matched or exceeded the secret to our success. Today, more than ever, Americans need more knowledge and skills to meet the demands of a growing global economy without having to take on decades of debt before they even embark on their career.

Today the President is unveiling the America’s College Promise proposal to make two years of community college free for responsible students, letting students earn the first half of a bachelor’s degree and earn skills needed in the workforce at no cost. Continue reading

College Access & the Admissions Office

As a higher education professional who works with low-income, first-generation college students at a large, top-tier research university, I believe the admissions office plays the role of the “gatekeeper” in terms of providing access to prospective college students. Their practices and policies definitely lean in favor of those from higher income families who are more versed in the admissions process.

A recent article from the Chronicle of Higher Education, “Why the Admissions Office May Be Part of the Problem of College Access” discusses this issue.

“The admissions office, especially at highly selective institutions, is the agent that keeps these students out of college in the first place, by creating a game that is heavily skewed in favor of students from high-income, well-educated families.”

Like the author, who is also a higher education professional, I too believe that it is time to change the requirements and means of evaluating students for college admissions. Admissions requirements still weigh test scores as an indicator of college admissions by using scores to assess the success they believe students will have at their institutions. However, research should have taught us long ago, that low-income and/or minority students are are more likely to have lower standardized test scores (SAT, ACT, etc.), than their counterparts.

Additionally, other factors such as class rank (which can be heavily based on the amount of AP (Advanced Placement), IB (International Baccalaureate) or honors courses students take, depending on the schools and their methods of calculating grade point averages and ratios), letters of recommendation, legacy status, and extracurricular activities are also weighted heavily. But what if a student from a lower socioeconomic status (SES) background had to work after school to provide for himself and contribute to the family income, and was unable to be involved in extracurricular activities? what if that same student was first-generation and no one ever talked to him about the importance of networking, building relationships with college officials, high school counselors, admissions reps, teachers etc. in order to get a great letter of recommendation or proofread his admissions essays? And what if that student made all A’s in all of his classes, but did not have the chance to graduate in the top 10% of his high school class because he was not in AP or IB classes? Finally, what if he did not have the money or additional resources needed for ACT or SAT prep classes, so he did not make high scores on his exams? Does he not deserve to be admitted into a selective university? Does his lack of money and social capital automatically mean that he will not succeed in college? After all, he did maintain high grades while being employed and taking on family responsibilities at home, which can sometimes make it more difficult to manage time effectively than students who are involved in clubs and organizations.

According to the article, if institutions want to continue to increase the enrollment of first-generation, low-income, or minority students, there should be an expectation that the admissions offices do more. I agree, but I also add, that additional measures and services must be implemented to support students before they set foot on campus, while they are learning how to navigate the college environment during their first-year, and beyond. These students come with a unique set of challenges that begin once they accept admission, and these challenges must be addressed not underscored or dumped into student affairs or students services offices. Academic affairs must also assist. It should be the interest of everyone entity on campus that has a connection with the students to understand and accommodate their unique needs, if the mission of the institution truly endeavors to provide them with the best education and opportunity for development possible.

Source: Chronicle of Higher Education http://chronicle.com/article/Why-the-Admissions-Office-May/150883/